Usability.

Ben Logan
2 May 2011

Mobile usability testing uses many traditional testing skills. Some particular issues to consider include: field testing’s greater potential benefit, including each mobile device category within your testing and using a device-mounted camera to observe & record sessions. Introduction – to mobile usability testing In March 2011, UK smartphone penetration reached 33%1. Another study found that data usage on UK mobile devices increased by over 75% in the first quarter of 2011.2 This means that it is becoming increasingly likely that significant numbers of your customers may want to use mobile devices to research and/or interact with your company. In order…

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Ben Logan
7 February 2011

Meeting user expectations throughout a site normally delivers good usability. Ways to make sure you meet expectations: user research, reviewing competitor sites and following usability guidelines. Meeting expectations improves usability A key principle within usability is that people carry around a ‘mental model’ of how we expect the world to behave1. These models are based on past experiences and can be a very powerful factor in influencing how people behave in certain situations. In our experience of usability testing, usability suffers when a site does not match users’ expectations. Indeed, our usability testing sessions have repeatedly shown that breaking expectations makes…

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Ben Logan
10 January 2011

Users are impatient, so sites should load quickly. Most users only scan web pages, so they should be specifically written for the web. User behaviour drives usability Over the past 12 years of working on usability projects, we’ve had lots of opportunity to observe user behaviour (from activities such as usability testing, paper prototyping and web analytics). This has shown us lots of examples of a basic usability principle:users are impatient and don’t pay attention. Most of us know this intuitively from the silly mistakes we’ve made ourselves (“How could I not have seen that?!”). At its heart, the field…

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Ben Logan
25 February 2010

Navigating large websites has always been a design problem not just with regards to information architecture and taxonomies but also specifically how that information is presented visually on the page. Web navigation is a key area for usability and new navigation methods are introduced frequently as web programming languages evolve. The last twelve months has seen several large retail sites using ‘mega menus’ as their primary navigation structure. In this article we have reviewed five popular retails sites in the UK with regards to the usability of the mega menus in the site, and we have developed our own check…

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Spotless
25 February 2010

Mark McElhaw – Published: 25th Feb 2010 13:42 GMT Over the last 10 years, practitioners have been debating whether and how eye tracking fits with usability research. But how can you compare a method with a technology? Perhaps if we understand some of the real issues of this debate, you’ll be in a better position to find the right method, tools and media to measure your user experience. You can get the same results at a fraction of the cost. A colleague once told me traditional usability testing can uncover as much as 95‰ issues at a third the cost…

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Ben Logan
21 April 2009

In this article we look at ten tips aimed at improving the usability of your homepage. Your homepage gives an impression to end users about how professional your organisation is. Users may arrive at your site at a landing page or an article deep within your site and they are highly likely to navigate back to the homepage in their journey. 1. Is it clear what you do and what your site offers? This should be immediately apparent to the end user, and if you have one, your tagline should help summarise in one sentence the purpose of the site…

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Ben Logan - Director

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